Soy Miso Honey Glazed Turkey

T-minus two days and counting. Are you ready? Excited? Freaking out? Well, I hope you're ready, excited, and not freaking out cause Thanksgiving's all about family and friends and thankfulness. No one's gonna judge you if the turkey comes out a little crispy (read: burnt) on the giant drumsticks or if you forget the cranberry sauce in the fridge. However, don't let that stop you from whipping up a dreamiest turkey dinner there ever was. I'm sure I'm not the only one headed to the market to day (welp!) but I've got my list in order and am so excited to cook up a feast with my mama. I'm also currently plotting how to get everyone to agree to watch the last Hunger Games movie with me and debating how many desserts is too many desserts. I'm planning on making this Pumpkin Spice Japanese Cheesecake and thinking about making Deb's fantastic Pecan Pie with a black bottom (aka dark chocolate) because chocolate + pecan is winners and I know my dad loves it. 

This turkey is loosely adapted from another Joanne Chang recipe, 'cuz Joanne Chang (is awesome). I took a few (a lot of) liberties with this one and decided to make it my own. Feel free to use this one as a point of inspiration to craft your ultimate turkey recipe. This turkey's loaded with crazy umami all over the place and is quickly becoming one of my favorite versions. I probably should have asked this sooner, but are you a even a turkey fan? I love it and could honestly eat it every other month if I felt like Moses would be into it. I actually feel the same way about ham. Maybe I should rotate turkey and ham every other month? Or maybe not. Maybe that's a little weird...however, I am thinking of doing like a half Thanksgiving and a half Christmas next year. You can never have too many days to say thank you and show your gratitude for those you love. Amiright!? 

Anywhoo, it's time for my weekly update. I lost (my fantasy football matchup). Again. And I for a minute I thought I blew it not putting the Packers in for defense but either way I'd have lost cause when three of your best guys have byes and the rest of your team is hit or miss, you lose. Can't say I'm surprised about this week's loss, so c'est la vie. I'm choosing to focus on all the wonderful things in my life, like you guys! Thanks so much for making this year incredible. I'm soooo pumped and honored to share this space with all of you. Cheers to you! And thank you, again!

Ps - I've got a big surprise planned (as a way of saying thank you for a great year) and am kicking it off next week, so stay tuned for that! 

Soy Miso Honey Glazed Turkey

Loosely adapted from Joanne Chang 

Makes one 12 - 14 lb. turkey + gravy


  • 2 c. + 1/2 c. soy sauce, divided
  • 1 c. honey
  • 1/2 c.  + 1/4 c. white miso, divided
  • 1/4 c. toasted sesame oil
  • 5-inches, peeled and thinly sliced fresh ginger + 2-inches, peeled and finely grated fresh ginger
  • 5 garlic cloves, finely grated
  • One 12- to 14-pound turkey
  • 4 Tbsp. + 4 Tbsp. unsalted butter, softened and divided
  • 2 Tbsp. kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Chinese five spice
  • 4 tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 6 green onions, cut into 4-inch lengths, + more sliced on a bias to garnish
  • 1 1/2 c. chicken stock
  • 1/2 c. soy sauce
  • 1/2 c. all-purpose flour


  • Large roasting pan
  • Medium saucepan
  • Turkey baster 
  • Brush
  • Gravy separator 
  • Whisk
  • Mixing bowls
  • Foil


  1. In a mixing bowl, whisk 2 cups soy sauce, honey, miso, sesame oil, grated ginger and garlic together. In place turkey, breast side down, in a container, large enough to fit entire turkey, and pour sauce over turkey. Cover and marinate in fridge for 2 hours then flip bird and marinate for another 2 hours. Remove from fridge and flip again then let come to room temperature for 45 minutes. 
  2. Preheat the oven to 350°. Set a rack in a large roasting pan. Mix salt, Chinese five spice, and pepper into 4 tablespoons of butter. Remove the turkey from the marinade and set on a rack in the roasting pan; reserve the marinade. Rub turkey inside and out with butter mixture. Stuff cavity with sliced ginger and 4-inch green onion pieces. While turkey is sitting, breast side up, cross the legs and loop a piece of kitchen twine over, around and under the crossed legs a couple times, and tie.  Turn the turkey breast side down on the rack. Add 2 cups of water to the roasting pan. Loosely cover the turkey with a foil tent.
  3. Roast the turkey for 3 hours, basting with some of the reserved marinade (storing marinade in the fridge) every hour and adding a total of 3 cups of water to the pan during roasting. After the third hour, transfer marinade to a medium saucepan, and cook on medium heat until reduced by half and thick and syrupy. Turn the turkey breast side up and brush on the syrupy glaze. Roast uncovered for 30 minutes, then brush on more glaze and roast for at least another 30 minutes. If you need to cook it longer, brush with glaze one more time and loosely tent with foil if skin begins to char. The turkey is done when an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thigh registers 165°.
  4. Carefully pour the juices from the turkey cavity into the roasting pan and transfer the turkey to a carving board. Let rest in a warm place for 30 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, strain the pan juices into a large saucepan and skim off the fat. Add the chicken stock and soy sauce to the juices along with 2 cups of water and bring to a boil.
  6. In a medium bowl, blend the butter with the flour to make a smooth paste. Gradually whisk in 2 cups of the hot pan juices until smooth. Whisk the mixture into the saucepan and bring the gravy to a simmer, whisking constantly, until thickened. Simmer the gravy over low heat, whisking occasionally, until no floury taste remains, about 8 minutes. Carve the turkey and garnish with sliced green onions; transfer gravy to a serving dish/bowl.
  7. Serve and enjoy!